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Three Strikes (and You're Out) Laws—Why These Laws Are Bad


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History

In the United States, habitual offender laws, commonly referred to as "three-strikes laws" were first implemented on March 7, 1994, and are part of the Department of Justice Anti-Violence Strategy.  These laws require two previous convictions in order to be applicable and sometimes make life in prison mandatory.  Twenty-eight states have some form of a three-strikes law.  Its purpose is to drastically increase the punishment of those convicted of more than two felonies, but, in some instances, convictions of more than just one criminal offense, not necessarily a felony, will still result in harsher penalties as it does in Washington, D.C.

Recklessly Driving Cop Got 41 Speeding and Red Light Tickets


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The car that got slapped with 63 tickets, including 34 speeding tickets and seven red light tickets, is parked in the foreground of the general mess at the 23rd station house in East Harlem.  Photo: Julianne Cuba

The fight to save our streets from recklessly driving cops now has a poster child.  Streetsblog’s ongoing investigation into police officers who repeatedly speed and run red lights unearthed a true sociopath in blue on Tuesday: An Upper East Side cop with 63 summonses—including 34 camera-issued speeding tickets and seven tickets issued for being caught on camera running a red light—since 2014.

The United States Legal System Oversteps Its Bounds


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The recent arrest of the chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou, of Chinese tech giant Huawei is a classic example of the United States legal system overstepping its bounds.  The CFO was released on bail in Canada, setting her up for a lengthy legal fight over extradition to the United States.  However, her arrest should never have happened in the first place.

Who are the Good Guys, and Who Are the Bad Guys? Part Three of a Three-Part Series


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On November 20, 2018, the Idaho Statesman ran an article written by former U.S. Forest Service agent Pat Finnigan in response to an article written by Statesman reporter Nicole Blanchard.  The first article was written after Nicole had spent the day at my home in Emmett, Idaho.  Nicole and I talked openly about the matters she wanted to discuss.  We talked about our families, about life since I have been home—we talked about “the movement” the Bundy family has supposedly started.  We spoke about the actions of federal officers from the BLM, U.S. Forest Service, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  Overall, Nicole reported accurately and fairly the information she was able to write about.

Who are the Good Guys, and Who Are the Bad Guys? Part Two of a Three-Part Series


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A long-time former CIA official and case officer, John Kiriakou became an anti-torture whistleblower and activist when he told ABC News in December 2007 that the CIA was torturing prisoners, that torture was official U.S. government policy, and that the policy was approved by the President.  John was driven to ruin by the Justice Department because of these revelations.

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