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Three Strikes (and You're Out) Laws—Why These Laws Are Bad


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History

In the United States, habitual offender laws, commonly referred to as "three-strikes laws" were first implemented on March 7, 1994, and are part of the Department of Justice Anti-Violence Strategy.  These laws require two previous convictions in order to be applicable and sometimes make life in prison mandatory.  Twenty-eight states have some form of a three-strikes law.  Its purpose is to drastically increase the punishment of those convicted of more than two felonies, but, in some instances, convictions of more than just one criminal offense, not necessarily a felony, will still result in harsher penalties as it does in Washington, D.C.

Experience of Someone in the Corrupt Indiana Courts


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The following is the introduction I included in an appellate brief I am filing with the Court of Appeals in the State of Indiana.  My journey stems from a child custody evaluation for my divorce in the Indiana family court system.  On August 19, 2009, Dearborn County Circuit Judge Humphrey stripped me of the ability to see my three- and five-year-old daughters claiming, “The Court is most concerned about [Brewington’s] irrational behavior toward Dr. Connor.”  There were no restraining orders or police reports.  No calls to social services. Nothing.

Stupid Government Trick: Fining an Engineer for Doing Math


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Be careful if you are doing math in Oregon without an engineering license . . . even if you are an engineer.  Or you may be fined by the Oregon State Board of Examiners for Engineering and Land Surveying.

That is what happened to Mats Järlström.  After his wife got a ticket issued because of a red light camera violation, Mr. Järlström did a study of yellow lights at intersections with red light cameras.

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